Asymmetric Information

wired:

fastcompany:

…had it not been for social media, the government would likely have succeeded in hiding the protests from many Turks. Turkey is a country that jails more journalists than Iran, and it is hardly surprising that the mainstream Turkish media, which has been additionally co-opted by the authorities through financial measures, broadcast pictures of beauty contests and cooking shows for several days while parts of Istanbul and other cities were blanketed with tear gas.

“On Friday [May 31] I saw on Facebook that there were riots, and I came here [to the center of Istanbul],” a 29-year old teacher named Ulas said in a bar near Taksim Square. “There were many people and we fought them [the police] all night. But on Saturday I spoke to some of my friends here in Istanbul, and they had no idea what was going on. One, a leftist, was at the zoo. This is because they were watching penguin documentaries on the mainstream channels.”

How social media forced Turkish news organizations to change course

[Photos by Victor Kotsev for Fast Company]

Wherein social media becomes a way to change the world. Again.

afp-photo:

TURKEY, Istanbul : A demonstrator’s clothes are set on fire during clashes with riot police in Taksim square on June 11, 2013. Riot police stormed Istanbul’s protest square on june 11, firing tear gas and rubber bullets at firework-hurling demonstrators in a fresh escalation of unrest after Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan said he would meet with protest leaders. AFP PHOTO / OREN ZIV

afp-photo:

TURKEY, Istanbul : A demonstrator’s clothes are set on fire during clashes with riot police in Taksim square on June 11, 2013. Riot police stormed Istanbul’s protest square on june 11, firing tear gas and rubber bullets at firework-hurling demonstrators in a fresh escalation of unrest after Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan said he would meet with protest leaders. AFP PHOTO / OREN ZIV

(via fotojournalismus)

teamepiphany:

Virtual supermarkets are popping up in subway stations in South Korea, where commuters can virtually shop for items while waiting for the train to come. Customers simply scan an item’s QR code using the free “Homeplus” app and can have it delivered to their doorstep before they even get home. Ranked as the 2nd most hard-working country in the world to Japan, South Korea is rewarding its workers with this timesaving gem.

dp67:

FloPan Live

concert video i directed. enjoy.